Stelios Valtzis

Stelios Valtzis

Durba Spring requires a very small deviation from original track. Possibly the most known and of the best camping spots along the entire route.
Well 5 / Canning Stock Route. One more significant point on Canning Stock Route. Reported as the deepest well on route at 31.8m.
Well 26 Tiwa is a very significant land mark along the route. Also vital for its well preserved well enabling to supply water along. Restored in 1983 in cooperation with Jigalong council. Still in first class order. Excellent clear water.
Kiwirrkarra Rd/Canning Stock Route Intersection is the point where the two famous roads intersect. Significant land mark along the two routes.
The Elephant’s Feet are on the Navajo Nation adjacent to U.S. Highway 160 about 1.5 miles north of Red Lake Trading Post. The Elephant’s Feet are two erosional remnants of the Cow Springs Member of the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone, which also forms the
Canyon de Chelly National Monument was established on April 1, 1931, as a unit of the National Park Service. Located in northeastern Arizona, it is within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation and lies in the Four Corners region. Reflecting one of the longest
Antelope Canyon is a slot canyon in the American Southwest, on Navajo land. It includes two separate, scenic slot canyon sections, referred to as Upper Antelope Canyon (or The Crack), and Lower Antelope Canyon (or The Corkscrew). The Navajo name for
Narbona Pass (formerly Washington Pass) is a pass through the natural break between the Tunicha and Chuska Mountains. A paved road, New Mexico Highway 134, crosses the range through Narbona Pass, connecting Sheep Springs to Crystal. Contrary to
The Navajo Nation Zoological and Botanical Park is located in Window Rock, Arizona, the capital of the Navajo Nation. It is the only tribally owned zoological park in the United States and is notable among zoological facilities in that it labels its exhibits in the
The Navajo Nation Museum is a modern museum and library on Navajo ground in Window Rock, Arizona. Its collections, exhibits, and other activities focus on the cultural history of the Navajo people. Its activities include traditional museum exhibits, a research library, and programs that help to revive and preserve the Navajo language.