Stelios Valtzis

Stelios Valtzis

The Tatacoa Desert is the second largest arid zone in Colombia. It occupies more than 330 square kilometers. It is renown as a rich deposit of fossils and a tourist destination. The Tatacoa Desert has two distinctive colors: ocher in the area of Cuzco and
Los Marmoles National Park. This road offers greet views of marble canyons and cliffs along the route, some few overviews and encrusted towns in the way. Beware while close to the deep 500m canyon, Barranca de Los Mármoles, with its steep and narrow curves (our pin is placed there).
From La Paz To Playa El Tecolote. This route offers incredible views of turquoise waters (aqua/teal color waters) in a series of small bays and beaches in a desert full of saguaros and cactus.
From El Enzuelado To Huejutla de Reyes. Popular route offering rocky hills within the tropical lush forest and tall mountains. Beware of constant fog in rainy season or ice in winter.
This route, unfortunately only one way, offers a challenging drive together with great mountain and desert landscape to explore and contemplate. The road is called Mexican Federal Highway 120. It descents from 1.550 meters in just 25 kilometers starting from
From Mezquitic To Monte Escobedo is a scenic drive of long valleys and some hills. The asphalted road departs from Monte Escobedo, Zacatecas (2200 masl) to a small community in a mesa mountain at 1930 masl, then continues to descend to Mezquitic, Jalisco at 1350 masl.
Camino a Grutas de Bustamante is asphalted road linking the town of Bustamante to the tourist attraction of Grutas de Bustamante natural caverns. This asphalted road has an elevation gain of 500 meters in less than a kilometer, with huge steep inclination and
Grutas de Bustamante (Bustamante Caves), also known as Palmito Caves, are a group of natural caves located in an entrance of the mountains known as Sierra de Gomas.The geologic formation that the caves formed in is thought to have formed between 50 and
The fortified Islamic town of Qasr ad-Dachla or el-Qasr (Arabic: قصر الداخلة, the Fortress) was built in the 12th century on the remains of a Roman fort in the NW of the Dakhla Oasis by the Ayyubid kings. Many of the up to four-storey mud brick Ottoman and
Deir el-Hagar, (Egyptian Arabic: دير الحجر 'Monastery of Stone'), is a Roman sandstone temple on the western edge of Dakhla Oasis, about 10 km from Qasr ad-Dachla. In Pharaonic times it was known as Resting Place, or Set-whe. The Temple was erected during the